Tips & Stories

3 Steps to Get More Productive with Evernote

3 Steps to Get More Productive with Evernote

Posted by Stefanie Fazzio on 13 Jun 2013

Posted by Stefanie Fazzio on 13 Jun 2013

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Contributed post by Joshua Zerkel

Joshua Zerkel, Evernote Productivity Ambassador

Joshua Zerkel, Evernote Productivity Ambassador

One of the best things about Evernote is that there’s no right or wrong way to implement it. This is great because you can mold Evernote to meet your needs, but first you need to make a plan. That’s how you’ll maximize your productivity. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Clarify your goals. What, specifically, does being more productive mean to you at work? What are you trying to accomplish? Create a note in Evernote, spend some time brainstorming what you’re trying to accomplish, and use numbered lists to prioritize your goals.

Start small. Pick a specific, manageable project to begin with. If you’re working on personal productivity, a good place to start is to enter your to-dos and tasks into Evernote, then use the Reminders feature to stay on track. On the flip side, if you’re looking to boost your team’s productivity, start by creating a shared notebook (or one in your Business Library if you’re using Evernote Business) that contains key information that you want team members to have access to.

Grow. One project at a time, build on what you’ve created and expand how you use Evernote. Try sharing project folders with your clients or vendors, or create a central timeline for a project (with reminders) in Evernote, and share that with your team. Add elements gradually and strategically, and you’ll find that Evernote can be a foundation for your continued success and productivity at work.

Learn more about Josh and our other Ambassadors by visiting our Community page. For tips and resources to help you be more productive with Evernote at work check out Josh’s ebook, Evernote at Work, or visit our Evernote for Work page! 

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17 Comments RSS

  • Jay Newman

    I totally agree. I’m an entrepreneur with a fast-growing business. I feel I can do a lot with Evernote but I feel that I can spend days if not weeks reading up and looking for videos on examples for how to go about structuring and approaching strategy for the use of Evernote. Where can we find the best examples and considerations as guides for customizing one’s approach to how they organize and use it?

    • Chase Adams

      Notebook stacks can be use but I find a lot of times they just get in the way of my productivity. I have an inbox, a todo and an archive & it you leverage the power of search you might find that regardless of the amount of notes you have, it will scale. After sometime you’ll start to find repeated tasks (searching for tax documents, ie), and that is when you create a new notebook for taxes. Don’t get caught up in the process at the get go, it’ll only bog you down and make it less likely that you’ll actually utilize the full potential of Evernote as a productivity tool.

  • Brian Phillips

    gsmart,

    I used the David Allen set up guide to get started.

    https://secure.davidco.com/store/catalog/Setup-Guides-p-1-c-263.php

  • Charlie Mowat

    check out thesecretweapon.org – I discovered this time / task management process in jan and its changed my life. I now use Evernote 100% for my workflow

  • mxturner

    I have been using Evernote almost three years now. I believe someone new just needs to start small and ease into it. The most important thing is you have to want to use it, to be committed to going paperless. I use it for work to keep notes about customers including emails and phone calls. I use it at home for car maintentance, price checking and keep track of receipts of items that have warranties. I could go on and on. I created a “My Evernot List” of features I use and like that I share with my friends.

  • Nick Gracilla

    This post was sent to me via email newsletter under the title, “See how Evernote can help you work smarter and accomplish more by maximizing your productivity”. But really, this article has no useful content. Suggesting that users start small and try out features over time is not “maximizing my productivity.” In fact, the HTML email newsletter, promotion, blog article, and attention paid to it have done quite the opposite—it has wasted my time and productivity. This is unusual for Evernote and a disappointment.

    I acknowledge that the author has likely contributed this for free, but it only muddies the water of how folks might productively use Evernote in a work context, and does not live up to its own promotion.

  • Tracey Smith

    This is exactly what I have been doing. As a teacher I have a little bit of free time over the summer and have been doing all I can to learn how to better use Evernote. Found some great videos and guides and have been devouring all the info I can and love EN more every time I learn a new thing!

  • John

    gmart and Jay Newman makes some valid points. Might I suggest that someone begin collecting, compiling, and publishing a (work-in-progress) set of “Best Practices”? This is what I have done over the 40+ years of my computer-related profession and have been converting previous notes and publication shipets to Evernote Notebooks… just my 2 cents.

  • John

    gmart and Jay Newman makes some valid points. Might I suggest that someone begin collecting, compiling, and publishing a (work-in-progress) set of “Best Practices”? This is what I have done over the 40+ years of my computer-related profession and have been converting previous notes and publication shipets to Evernote Notebooks… just my 2 cents.

  • John

    Since Evernote is such a “moldable” tool, your principles are very relevant. Creative people will find creative ways to use it. I have increased my own productivity by creating a dynamic taxonomy using tagging and saved searches. Keep up the good work.

  • Frank

    Sadly I was thinking the same as Matt. It would have helped if the author explained how he built his use of Evernote into his routine. I have yet to
    find a way to use Evernote and increase my or my team’s productivity. But I do use it for my personal projects as an accumulator of information. I tried to use it as a task list but never found it to be very productive. I read the responses to this article and there are tons of good ideas and all would make the product better. I rely on several other aps that have better organization, sharing and are easier to set-up. I watched that one video of setting up Evernote and it reminded me of when I had to make labels for folders in a filing cabinet, not very intuitive. I love Evernote for what it does but do not use it or try to force using it for anything else.

  • Pat Caltabiano

    Matt seriously you’re then one wasting everyone’s time.
    I think the article working smarter is just right Joshua
    There is no wrong or right way but as a realtor I use each Note in a category-way!
    I try to be organized but having my Listings, and/0r my leads here is a priceless

    Way to find my info always!
    Thank you
    Pat Caltabiano, Agent
    Exit Realty Top Properties Brooklyn!

  • Greg Savage

    Strange. I am on a Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 and bullets/numbers work fine. I have been a paid subscriber for two years.

  • Jami Hede

    I use checklists and numbered lists on my Android tablet all the time. Don’t have any difficulty.

  • Jami Hede

    I use checklists and numbered lists on my Android tablet all the time. Don’t have any difficulty.

  • Jennifer

    Hi John, thanks for sharing the TSW website. It is very useful. I am a beginner for Evernote so it really helps me to use the tool more effectively. Thanks.

  • Dan Lakey

    Was a follower of GTD previously, then I read about TSW and evernote and completely revolutionized my use of GTD. It is my LIFE organizer. At work I have projects going on all over the place in multiple areas and it keeps them all on track and keeps me from having to try to remember everything. Away from work it makes life much simpler.